About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
SFGTV2 96
LANGUAGE
English 96
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)
how movement in the city can help us establish patterns, trends, and other things. and they're going to share that data with us. and i believe that data is going to be value with us as we figure out challenges like the small businesses along west portal or in terra val, along 3rd street who see their vacancies and they ask the mayor, how can you invest in neighborhood strategy work a little better with us to attract people to come and be customers in our neighborhood, coffee shops, restaurants, salons and other things? how can we do that? we've always scratched our head saying, you kind of have to do it yourself. you have to create your ideas yourself. and now we're saying, well, maybe there is data out there that could help establish some best practices, can help maybe quicken the ideas of what might be more attracted to our smaller neighborhoods. well, this is the kind of data out there, analytics, if you will, the analytical model that are being created by our local san francisco companies like motion loft and others, who are using these data yet can share it with the government a
we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot
francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders, young artists, queer and colorful, innovators and students, all inside our magnificently and uniquely diverse and never-changing city. san francisco will never be what it was, nothing in life will be. but as i heard recently, we are always nostalgic for a time that never was and often wanting to avoid a future that is inevitable. will change in san francisco as in everywhere is inevitable. and change can be beautiful. we are all of us the agents of change. as george and harvey were. each one of us is the story teller of our lives and the lives of the people we've lost. and that wasn't always the case, as willie mentioned. but because of the likes of george and harvey and so many others, all the way to our mayor ed lee, all of us have voice. all of us can tell the story. so, let's crowd source this thing. let's tell the real stories of george and harvey. stories of their hard work and politics and the families and loved on
and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are mong on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that create
of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been working closely with jay nath and mayor leon that will real i do three things. first of all, it will create a chief data officer because we need one person who is responsible and accountable for moving forward our open data agenda. secondly, we're going to require every department in the city to have a representative who is responsible for data so you can go to our transit agency, our police d
but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide this information to you. my third idea, i want to thank our rec and park department. you're going to be hearing a little bit from the director of that department, phil ginsberg about the new application they have helped us with. i'm very proud of what
is focused on how do we make government more efficient, how do we make it more effective, and how do we use information to make better decisions. and i think that's why the mayor has asked that the chief data officer sit in my office. so that they have access to financial information as well as a team of people who are already inclined to work on analytical problems. so, as the mayor and board president chiu indicated we'll be hiring a chief data officer looking for the best and brightest people. so, if you know of people or if you yourself are interested, i'd love to talk to you, so, find me after. the role of this person is to figure out how do we build on what we've already done in terms of open data, how do we make government more transparent, what kinds of standards are needed to make sure that data is accessible both within the city, between agencies and also to the private sector and the public. and i think that this person, this data officer really will help us do what many of you in the private sector are already doing well, which is using that information to make better decisions.
will be on the down-low, so you have my blessing. if i may ask all to join us and make a toast to the future. >> don't count. one, two, three. very nice. very nice. >> need some help? >> cheers. >> we will be available for questions. thank you very much. >> the garden contains plants referred to by william shakespeare's plays and poems. located near the academy of sciences, shakespeare's garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring and wild flower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil little garden tucked behind the path of a charming rot iron gate with romantic magic. the overarching cherry trees, the gorgeous big walkway and brick wall, the benches, the rustic sun dial. the pack picnic, lovely bench, enjoy the sunshine and soft breeze and let the much. >> i want to welcome everybody. i'm from kiss fm and the voice of your san francisco giants at the park. we've got to great program planned for you today and keep that energy up. and thank you to lincoln high school. this is going to be a very exciting day as mayor lee and the giants kickoff the campaign. it is our goal along
wilson. ♪ ♪ to keep you clean is why we gather here. it's time for us to care. that's why i'll help our mayor to polish every street with one big giant sweep. oh, whistle why while you work. and carefully together we'll show our pride. just like the giants we will triumph but there's work to do. no litering so make sure you pick up your trash. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ so whistle while you work. we must work hard to reach our goal keep san francisco beautiful. just work don't be a quiter. keep our city all a glitter. san francisco. open your golden gate you've let no stranger wait outside your door. san francisco here is you're wondering one saying i'll litter no more. others loose only make me love you best. so listen everybody i have one request. clean up the mess. san francisco. welcome me home again. i'm coming home to leave no more. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> did you all enjoy that? let's go mustangs. that's right keep that energy going. of course, the cheerleaders are right in there. keep that energy your enthusiasm and your applause going now. it's with my honor i introduce to you the mayor of the sa
, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk (music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i thought everyone should know that. this was my purpose. and after we opened, which was a spectacular opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going f
as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from the governments here in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more abilit
with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass it over
] >> i saw merl and larry, if you want to join us. as we said, this building is complex. and it starts with the funding. it will get more complicated with the construction pretty soon, but it has really been an unbelievable group effort to pull together the different funders of this work. we heard about the koret's foundation amazing con tributionss and i know there have been so many amazing contributions on the st. anthony side. for an affordable housing project for this it takes incredible people and we start with hud, who supplied over $20 million to make this project possible. larry ferguson is here, the director of the hud 202 programs that gets the senior housing funds and an important thing to know about the hud 202 programs not only do they provide capital, but a rental subsidy. so seniors on social security, or even less income don't have to worry about whether they can make a $1,000 rent payment. they pay 30% of whatever they can pay and the federal government helps us make up the difference, so we can keep people housed. there are folks out there who understand why this is
for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. these are at least two things that we are introducing today. there are potentially more to come, but we wanted to
for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want
conroy from the department of justice is here. thank you for joining us. i want to bring up mayor lee so she can bring up the announcements of the honorees for today. apl(applause) >> thank you emily and thank you to the commission on the status of women to our human rights commission thank you for being here and the commissioners and staff as well. thank you police chief for being here and certainly all the other department heads. wendy thank you for being here as well. members of the community. advocacy groups that have been so important to this movement. supervisor carmen chu, i know you and mayor newsom had this initial effort back some years ago to recognize the need to abolish human trafficking. an san francisco being such an international city, many of our roots are from immigrant families. we understand the problem. we did do something about it and continue that effort. i want to thank the us attorney's office for being here. and so many of you who have from the community done and continue to do what you can do to end human trafficking. this is such an important challenge for
generously offered to help us and support us and today that is where we are housed. we have a membership of over 28 agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sound
government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o ass
it would be, like, oh, thumbs up, the school wrote us a letter, our da, our district attorney to come see us, she wrote us a letter, so that's how you fund it. >> what he's mentioning is the former chancellor of the los rios college district, the former chancellor is now the statewide chancellor of community colleges, brad ferris who recently retired and now is the state chancellor of community colleges. he me out and saw us, surprised us one day. i felt like one of those dogs that won't stop rubbing against your leg. he really liked it. >> i don't see why not, we want to definitely express a word. a question over there? >> when i first read the description of the play tonight i was thinking in my mind, well, maybe i can skip it .s i didn't see what i would get out of it but you guys are 100 percent right on (applause) i been tracking gravanis for about 3 or 4 years. i'm not a tagger, a kid got shot, he is handicapped right now, another one shoplifting, one got stuck, they had to come get him, he was 12 years old. this young kid, it happened -- that's just in the last year and a half
're focused on ammunition and immediate interruption in the behavior that law enforcement advises us and sees every day that leads to more violence. in the weeks and months to come, the board and the mayor's office will be introducing both more ideas and legislation and resolutions to support federal and state efforts in the same direction. at the same time, we'll also be introducing through our budget support for an ongoing organizing in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it
but that came together. and for welcoming in this new year we call it the year of the serpent but some of us will refer to as as a year of the many dragon. of course i want to recognize carmen chu hao district 4 supervisor as well; she has been a strong leader helping us promote the new year's as well of course taking care of her district, working as a wonderful supervisor. i am excited about this new year too because it has an opportunity to unveil many of our cultural aspirations in the city of san francisco. it has been 160 years, and we know our history well. my ascension to this office has been one of those things that people still consider me pretty special so much special not because of me but because of our community. this tab will have international status. gobs of people will want to have it, reflective of not only our history but if i go to washington dc tomorrow we will have an opportunity to talk with the rest of the mayors across the country is to how to celebrate new year's. this would be another example. want to congratulate again claudine and the whole team, postmas
be after you gave us direction in early december to pursue this option as a preferable one upon hearing the concerns of the community from the current approved plan which is to remove the tunnel boring machines from columbus avenue. as the supervisor said, and you're correct in saying, if it weren't for his leadership and the leadership of mayor lee, we wouldn't have gotten this done. it really took the city family coming together and the personal involvement of president chiu and mayor lee. so, very grateful that we are all able to come together. as he he also said, it wasn't just the mta staff, but planning department, city attorney's office. we had the economic development folks involved, the building inspection, really everybody coming together in a pretty extraordinary way and under an extraordinary timeline. so, what we're happy to be bringing to you, a proposed lease that we were close to having done in time for last meeting, have now since gotten done. didn't want to bring it to you until it was signed by the other party, and until the initial planning commission approvals or th
in chinatown or in district 3 there is someone that is always there with us, whether it's the broadway streetscape improvement, or the many projects that go on polk street or all around the neighborhood, please ask supervisor david chiu to say a few words >> good morning everyone, happy new year and happy new year of the mini dragon. i want to thank the chinese community coming together for today's announcement, as well as members of the honorary chinese community. this is a conversation that did start as i recall in one of the first meetings that i had with mayor lee when he was elected last year. we talked about how do we ensure that the oldest, historic and most amazing chinatown community in the country can continue to offer a new year's experience that is authentic and reflects the community? and i want to thank the city departments for working together for the pilot program. we learned from that and hope to build from that. special thanks to our dpw crew and our police department and our department of public health to make sure that our pedestrians are safe and our private se
also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should also hear them ask for
we've done before because we have the data that shows us more and more where the hot spots are all over the city. and we have also been concentrating on what makes a neighborhood more dangerous for pedestrians, what makes a neighborhood more safer. and i suggest to you tonight that -- or today that in our downtown area is probably one of the most safest areas to walk buzz we pay a lot more attention to that area. but there are a lot of other places where we haven't considered the issues of lowering the speed, as we've done around our schools with walk sf. we haven't done enough study around the data, completed the data of collision and pedestrian injuries as well as we should have to make it safer. so, our pedestrian strategy really is in draft form. we have completed it in this month, and we plan to introduce it throughout the various public agencies and commissions and allow it to be publicly vented. but we do have two very solid goals, and that is by 2016, we want to reduce the number of serious or fatal pedestrian accidents by 25% in the next four years. and by 20 21, by 50%. w
rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behaviors that fall under expulsion and suspending and when talking to administrators and their policies he found it helpful to speak of these terms in termses of behaviors and rather than saying we're criminalizing you and the think language is also important and i want to thank you for bringing up that point. it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention.
health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is where i want to make sure i recognize all of the people that are in that effort of doing something about it, including the officials in san francisco. and some have been at this longer than others to try to do something about it, have reached limitations. yet again, i think this tragedy at sandy hook reminds us that we've got to keep trying and we've got to keep doing more about it. and, so, i want to first of all recognize that senator feinstein, in my conversations with her, and the tragedies she's experienced as mayor of san francisco as well as her attempts to ban assault weapons and had done so in the past, and that her federal assault legislation, while ended, she will reintroduce that in january and we will be big supporters of that. and she will continue dialoguing on a national level, and we will support her efforts and the efforts of all of our feder
policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional e
. we're also using those dollars to improve the quality of life, and as jackie spear pointed out plan for the future and economic prosperity of this whole area. when this subway extension opens as senator feinstein pointed out there will be 44,000 people using this light rail line. what she didn't point out that will make it the second or third busiest light rail in the united states. this is an environment that needs to be made and once it's built are gone the days when we have senior citizens watching the drive by and waiting for a bus that won't stop and then they have to stand on the bus and that bus has to crawl through the same traffic as the cars and get there in way too long period of time. means we will get into a elevator and on the rail and get to your destination in as little as eight minutes. for transit to succeed in the country it needs to be reliable and viable and we need it in the bay area reliable. muni has its challenges and bart is running the oldest rail cars in the united states right now. >> is it over? >> it's over. [applause] >> congratulations san franci
. the first place poster altogether for all of us to see. i would like to name everybody. community youth center of san francisco, the young asian women against violence youth participant jennifer chang. kimberly how. erica lam. allie lee. adriana wen (sounds like) diana -- and amy ung. congratulations everybody. (applause) (applause) (applause) good job everybody. thank you. and so at this time supervisor -- or do i give it back to -- nancy. thank you again. >> at this time we would like to call supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> i think that is part of the program they wanted the winners to perhaps say a few words. >> thank you for choosing our picture. we were really surprised when you did. we are really happy. (applause) >> we were very surprised. thank you very much. (applause) >> i'm tiffany chung, so happy to be recognized in such a way. thank you very much. (applause) >> hi. i name is amy. thank you for letting us having this opportunity to make this poster and also recognize us. thank you. (applause) >> thank you. i want to thank mayor lee and the members of the collabor
such a champion here today with us to bring that word back to the folks. [phra*-uplt/] >> i'm going to do more thank yous as we go through the process, but i wanted to just turn it over to barry to talk a little bit about this from the st. anthony's perspective. >> thank you, doug. it's already been said a number of times already today, this is exciting. many of us have been waiting a long, long time for this day. of course we're all here today to celebrate something new. but when i look out on all of you gathered here, i see something very familiar about this gathering. yes, we're here to break ground on something new, a new buildings that will house the new st. anthony's dining room and 90 units of affordable housing for our seniors, sponsored by mercy. but when i look out and i see all of these different people gathered here, jones and golden gate, i'm sorry struck by how in so many ways it's very normal and natural. there is nothing different about today than other days. people hanging out, on this corner, is nothing new. yes, a new venture with mercy housing and st. anthony foundation in
seeking federal funding nationwide, and it will be the most happily used muni line. that's the rational for this project. no question it's expensive. it's worth it if people use it. it's worth it if they stay out of the automobile. it's worth it if it aids in creating space on our bus lines so it's a very important project. i am here to help in my way which is as an appropriator in the senate. jackie has helped in her way. nancy has helped in her way as a leader of a great political party in washington, so mr. secretary everybody that is here we thank you for our responsiveness. it's just great to welcome you here and go giants. [applause] >> mateo county supervisor to both houses of our california state legislature since 2008 and she has been in congress for jobs and our environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor le
our very own first lady, mrs. anita lee. i see a number of other dignitaries who are here with us today. council general gao and council general hawk of china and singapore. and to our many department heads who are here. we have harlen kelly with puc and mrs. kelly, the city administrator. and chief white. and we have our recorder, nu nguyen and the mayor's office of housing. there are a number of other commissioners here as well. i want to recognize, i did see rodney fung and mrs. riley in the crowd. and to the many others here, thank you for joining with us today. and so this is our ninth annual city hall lunar new year celebration. i am feel honored to welcome you here today. for years san francisco has been a shining example of how we get things done together. and not only have folks from asian-american community and from all walks of life. san francisco is truly a melting pot. we want to celebrate our lunar new year and hope for a prosperous new year. and my new role as assessor, we hope that is true. rather than dragging out this presentation. i want to bring up to speak a n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)